Sunday, July 6, 2014

Finally getting into the Tetons! It was a long day..

It wasn't really that long of a day, only drove about 350 miles, but this was in a caravan and Jackson, Wyoming the week before the 4th of July is a shit-show.  Nearly as bad as coming though Salt Lake on the Friday Afternoon before the 4th as everyone is trying desperately to be somewhere else, and Salt Lake driver suck...  It would have been much simpler if we also did not have to drive like a giant caterpillar of University vehicles.

Once again Michael Marsh was the designated photographer, although after this I was able to take my hands off the steering wheel and start taking pictures for myself.  It was so nice.

On a side note as I sit at the Starbucks (Ok, their Blonde Roast is tolerable once it cools down, not the best, but better than Folgers) there is a group of people at the next table who have been planning a wedding.  Likely the most expensive wedding that I have ever heard of.  From the numbers that I have heard going back and forth they could elope and get a new BMW.
Another nice little set of shacks in the shadow of the snow covered mountains.

I apologize about the window glare, we were driving at the time.  On another side note, some girl riding in a Van down the street just yeller "Hello World!" at us...  This is a silly city....

The mountains have an ability to maintain unnatural steepness when there is a lack of precipitation.

The snow melt did produce some raging rivers....  Kayaking anyone?

And trees, we finally had trees again.

I should tell Michael about keeping the camera level, we were going sixty down windy mountain highways however.

Everything was once again tipping...  The Tetons have an interesting geologic history, the mountains are on the standing wall and the valley sits on the hanging wall which is sliding down and away as the valley spreads out.  The end result is that the mountains rise up as the valley sinks and fills with sediment.

And now we have the Tetons!  Some of that snow is not ephemeral at all, although it will likely be so within our lifetimes.  If you want to see a mountain glacier in the Continental US start making you travel plans now.

This is the river that ran near the campsite.  

Another picture of the Tetons, these mountains were over 13,000 feet tall....

We camped on the backside of this Butte, Blacktail Butte or something like that, I will look it up later.  But is rather prominent in many of the photos from here on out.